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The history of the chateau at Klecany dates back to the end of the 14th century, at which time a three-winged fort was
built north of the town. Until the latter part of the 17th century, information is fragmentary, with period sources
speak of the building sometimes as a fort, sometimes as a chateau.
However, from the end of the 17th century, information about the chateau and its estate becomes more detailed. In 1691,
Václav Vojtěch of Šternberk acquired Klecany as his estate and it was on this occasion that the first detailed description of
the chateau was made. After acquisition, he made substantial renovations, the high costs of which resulted in the chateau’s
sale to the Gallas family, who subsequently owned it from 1727 until the early 19th century. During this period, Maria
Theresa of Austria visited the chateau twice, both visits (1754 and 1757) as a thank-you from the imperial court to the
then owner, Josef Filip Gallas, who held the position of highest Hofmeister of the Kingdom of Bohemia.
In 1803, the chateau was sold to Jan Woborzil, occupant of the Nelahozevec estate. His son, Johann Wilhelm Woborzil,
however, led an expensive social life and invested most of his time and money in his hobbies. As a result, he was forced to
sell the chateau in the mid-19th century. In fact, reports at the time claimed that as Woborzil, a dedicated ornithologist,
‘cares more for the fowl of the air than his fields of beet, he lost the whole of his properties’.
In 1847, renowned sugar-maker, Antonín Balle, became the new owner, and Klecany chateau remained in his ownership
until 1892, after which ownership passed to Jindřich Benies, and following their divorce to his wife Matylda.
An interesting architectural aside - during the period covered above, the Chateau burnt down three times; in 1827, 1857
and 1924, and each time it was rebuilt in a different style according to fashion of the day. The chateau’s current appearance,
the Empire Style according to a design by Kašpar Předák. is a result of repairs made after the third fire.
Back to the history - During the Second World War, the chateau was briefly used (1942-1944) by Hitler Youth (Hitlerjugend),
and then, apart from a short spell as the base of the Czechoslovak Youth Union Central School, the building and its grounds
were used by the army until 1989.
Following the army’s guardianship, the chateau was acquired by a number of private companies, during which period
it increasingly fell into disrepair until 2003 when it was acquired by its current owner. Seeing it’s great potential yet
respectful of its heritage, he undertook an exhaustive programme of historical renovation whilst at the same time
extensively updating its facilities, thus returning Klecany to its former glory whilst creating a home befitting of the 21st
century.

The history of the chateau at Klecany dates back to the end of the 14th century, at which time a three-winged fort was 
built north of the town. Until the latter part of the 17th century, information is fragmentary, with period sources 
speak of the building sometimes as a fort, sometimes as a chateau.
However, from the end of the 17th century, information about the chateau and its estate becomes more detailed. In 1691, 
Václav Vojtěch of Šternberk acquired Klecany as his estate and it was on this occasion that the first detailed description of 
the chateau was made. After acquisition, he made substantial renovations, the high costs of which resulted in the chateau’s 
sale to the Gallas family, who subsequently owned it from 1727 until the early 19th century. During this period, Maria 
Theresa of Austria visited the chateau twice, both visits (1754 and 1757) as a thank-you from the imperial court to the 
then owner, Josef Filip Gallas, who held the position of highest Hofmeister of the Kingdom of Bohemia.
In 1803, the chateau was sold to Jan Woborzil, occupant of the Nelahozevec estate. His son, Johann Wilhelm Woborzil, 
however, led an expensive social life and invested most of his time and money in his hobbies. As a result, he was forced to 
sell the chateau in the mid-19th century. In fact, reports at the time claimed that as Woborzil, a dedicated ornithologist, 
‘cares more for the fowl of the air than his fields of beet, he lost the whole of his properties’. 
In 1847, renowned sugar-maker, Antonín Balle, became the new owner, and Klecany chateau remained in his ownership 
until 1892, after which ownership passed to Jindřich Benies, and following their divorce to his wife Matylda.
An interesting architectural aside - during the period covered above, the Chateau burnt down three times; in 1827, 1857 
and 1924, and each time it was rebuilt in a different style according to fashion of the day. The chateau’s current appearance, 
the Empire Style according to a design by Kašpar Předák. is a result of repairs made after the third fire.
Back to the history - During the Second World War, the chateau was briefly used (1942-1944) by Hitler Youth (Hitlerjugend), 
and then, apart from a short spell as the base of the Czechoslovak Youth Union Central School, the building and its grounds 
were used by the army until 1989.
Following the army’s guardianship, the chateau was acquired by a number of private companies, during which period 
it increasingly fell into disrepair until 2003 when it was acquired by its current owner. Seeing it’s great potential yet 
respectful of its heritage, he undertook an exhaustive programme of historical renovation whilst at the same time 
extensively updating its facilities, thus returning Klecany to its former glory whilst creating a home befitting of the 21st 
century.

The history of the chateau at Klecany dates back to the end of the 14th century, at which time a three-winged fort was 
built north of the town. Until the latter part of the 17th century, information is fragmentary, with period sources 
speak of the building sometimes as a fort, sometimes as a chateau.
However, from the end of the 17th century, information about the chateau and its estate becomes more detailed. In 1691, 
Václav Vojtěch of Šternberk acquired Klecany as his estate and it was on this occasion that the first detailed description of 
the chateau was made. After acquisition, he made substantial renovations, the high costs of which resulted in the chateau’s 
sale to the Gallas family, who subsequently owned it from 1727 until the early 19th century. During this period, Maria 
Theresa of Austria visited the chateau twice, both visits (1754 and 1757) as a thank-you from the imperial court to the 
then owner, Josef Filip Gallas, who held the position of highest Hofmeister of the Kingdom of Bohemia.
In 1803, the chateau was sold to Jan Woborzil, occupant of the Nelahozevec estate. His son, Johann Wilhelm Woborzil, 
however, led an expensive social life and invested most of his time and money in his hobbies. As a result, he was forced to 
sell the chateau in the mid-19th century. In fact, reports at the time claimed that as Woborzil, a dedicated ornithologist, 
‘cares more for the fowl of the air than his fields of beet, he lost the whole of his properties’. 
In 1847, renowned sugar-maker, Antonín Balle, became the new owner, and Klecany chateau remained in his ownership 
until 1892, after which ownership passed to Jindřich Benies, and following their divorce to his wife Matylda.
An interesting architectural aside - during the period covered above, the Chateau burnt down three times; in 1827, 1857 
and 1924, and each time it was rebuilt in a different style according to fashion of the day. The chateau’s current appearance, 
the Empire Style according to a design by Kašpar Předák. is a result of repairs made after the third fire.
Back to the history - During the Second World War, the chateau was briefly used (1942-1944) by Hitler Youth (Hitlerjugend), 
and then, apart from a short spell as the base of the Czechoslovak Youth Union Central School, the building and its grounds 
were used by the army until 1989.
Following the army’s guardianship, the chateau was acquired by a number of private companies, during which period 
it increasingly fell into disrepair until 2003 when it was acquired by its current owner. Seeing it’s great potential yet 
respectful of its heritage, he undertook an exhaustive programme of historical renovation whilst at the same time 
extensively updating its facilities, thus returning Klecany to its former glory whilst creating a home befitting of the 21st 
century.

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